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  • Is size directly related to strength?

    Discussion in 'Training' started by parnassto, Feb 24, 2012.

    1. parnassto

      parnassto Well-Known Member

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      Forgive me if this is a stupid question, but is strength directly related to size? In other words, if I focus on lifting heavier and heavier will that automatically translate into bigger muscles after awhile?

       
    2. jailynn24hb

      jailynn24hb Well-Known Member

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      Is size directly related to strength?

      at the beginning, provided there is a calorie surplus, they go together
       
    3. jailynn24hb

      jailynn24hb Well-Known Member

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      Is size directly related to strength?

      In general, yes. However different rep ranges, intensities, volumes etc will have different effects on your neural system and muscle hypertrophy.
       
    4. jailynn24hb

      jailynn24hb Well-Known Member

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      Is size directly related to strength?

      More or less, yes. There's very little support for the idea that you can build one without building the other. There are various ways you can have the illusion of building one without the other, but mostly anything that builds strength effectively will build size.

      -Andrew
       
    5. defelqy

      defelqy Well-Known Member

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      Is size directly related to strength?

      when my squat went from high 200's to 500 i changed to a completely new man. So yes.. but my believe is that a solid strength base is crucial for training for size Example is if you can max bench 100 and do tons and tons of high rep sets with 50lbs, i doubt your going to have a big chest/upper body. But if your maxing 400, and doing reps with 315, im sure your going to get big. just what i think.
       
    6. Korporalegq

      Korporalegq Well-Known Member

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      Is size directly related to strength?

      this isn't really a great example.

      a better way to explain what you're trying to say is: if today you are benching a 1RM of 100lbs and if by this time next year, you are benching a 1RM of 400lbs; you will be bigger
       
    7. fa2nzg

      fa2nzg Well-Known Member

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      Is size directly related to strength?

      Thanks for the answers. I know (or have heard) that there are many factors that help "maximize" one or the other such as reps, sets, type of exercise, and obviously weight. But I was curious if generally speaking adding to your 1 RM in a substantial way will mean bigger size....which based on your answers is true.
       
    8. Raleoxilevz

      Raleoxilevz Well-Known Member

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      Is size directly related to strength?

      yes and no. Many times olympic lifters and other lightweight lifters who put up heavy poundage do not appear that "swole" yet they put up weight from pure explosiveness and training their body to more fibers more efficiently.

      It kind of comes down to how the person lifts the weight, through more muscle fibers (bigger) or better efficiency of them (the lean but strong guys)...

      not sure if this is a good example though considering dat der celltech usage.
       
    9. vijugati8g

      vijugati8g Well-Known Member

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      Is size directly related to strength?

      Conclusion
      Initial changes to muscle strength are due to neural factors (motor unit activation, firing frequency, input from the opposite side of the spinal cord, input from muscle spindles and reflexes, input from lower and higher spinal cord levels). Over time, the increased rate of neural activation decreases to a slower rate and muscle hypertrophy commences (this is postulated to be stimulated by the neural system). The muscle CSA increases with continued training. This also results in increased strength. The CSA does not increase to the same extent as the muscle strength. The total strength increase is a combination of increased neural activation and muscle hypertrophy.

      http://physiotherapy.curtin.edu.au/r.../01/neural.cfm
       
    10. jailynn24hb

      jailynn24hb Well-Known Member

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      Is size directly related to strength?

      Yet weight lifting and power lifting both have weight classes so therefore size must play some factor
       

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