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  • DOMS advise

    Discussion in 'For Personal Trainers' started by Capone, Feb 28, 2012.

    1. remstation

      remstation Well-Known Member

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      DOMS advise

      Last edited by chilisi; 29-02-2012 at 04:12 PM.

       
    2. jailynn24hb

      jailynn24hb Well-Known Member

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      DOMS advise

      GENTLE exercise is good for relieving doms. when i get it bad i go for a slow ride around the local park and it makes a big difference for me
       
    3. masoven4u

      masoven4u Well-Known Member

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      DOMS advise

      OP and thats why a lot of people dont train legs, because it is hard and you do suffer with DOMS a couple of days after.

      Do as people have suggested. But keep training them every week the DOMS will still be there but will be less and you will cope with them better.
       
    4. remstation

      remstation Well-Known Member

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      DOMS advise

      http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1....pub3/abstract
       
    5. Bartomo

      Bartomo Well-Known Member

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      DOMS advise

      Was interested in your post so googled and found a bit more, quite interesting reading. I think a lot of people think doms is c aused by lactic acid but it isn't, it's caused by the damage you do to the muscle fibres while exercising -

      Lactic Acid

      The expression "lactic acid" is used most commonly by athletes to describe the intense pain felt during exhaustive exercise, especially in events like the 400 metres and 800 metres. When energy is required to perform exercise, it is supplied from the breakdown of Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP). The body has a limited store of about 85 grms of ATP and would use it up very quickly if we did not have ways of resynthesising it. There are three systems that produce energy to resynthesise ATP: ATP-PC, lactic acid and aerobic.

      The lactic acid system is capable of releasing energy to resynthesise ATP without the involvement of oxygen and is called anaerobic glycolysis. Glycolysis (breakdown of carbohydrates) results in the formation of pyruvic acid and hydrogen ions (H+). The pyruvic acid molecules undergo oxidation in the mitochondrion and the Krebs cycle begins. A build up of H+ will make the muscle cells acidic and interfere with their operation so carrier molecules, called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), remove the H+. The NAD+ is reduced to NADH that deposit the H+ at the electron transport gate (ETC) in the mitrochondria to be combined with oxygen to form water (H2O).

      If there is insufficient oxygen then NADH cannot release the H+ and they build up in the cell. To prevent the rise in acidity pyruvic acid accepts H+ forming lactic acid that then dissociates into lactate and H+. Some of the lactate diffuses into the blood stream and takes some H+ with it as a way of reducing the H+ concentration in the muscle cell. The normal pH of the muscle cell is 7.1 but if the build up of H+ continues and pH is reduced to around 6.5 then muscle contraction may be impaired and the low pH will stimulate the free nerve endings in the muscle resulting in the perception of pain (the burn). This point is often measured as the lactic threshold or anaerobic threshold (AT) or onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA).

      The process of lactic acid removal takes approximately one hour, but this can be accelerated by undertaking an appropriate cool down that ensures a rapid and continuous supply of oxygen to the muscles.

      Astrand et al. (1986) [1] found that the normal amount of lactic acid circulating in the blood is about 1 to 2 millimoles/litre of blood. The onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA) occurs between 2 and 4 millimoles/litre of blood. In non athletes this point is about 50% to 60% VO2 max and in trained athletes around 70% to 80% VO2 max.

      Lactic acid - friend or foe?

      Lactic acid (lactate) is not:

      * responsible for the burn in the leg muscles when exercising very fast
      * responsible for the soreness you experience in the 48 hours following a hard session
      * a waste product

      Lactate, which is produced by the body all day long, is resynthesized by the liver (Cori Cycle) to form glucose that provides you with more energy. Sounds like a friend to me.
       
    6. crormaSoila18

      crormaSoila18 Well-Known Member

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    7. fa2nzg

      fa2nzg Well-Known Member

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      DOMS advise

      I've just had a quick look myself.

      Apparently they aren't 100% what actually causes the pain, but have suggested rupturing of the muscles due to a heavy workload. Makes sense. And is not Lactic acid build up as this leaves the body within an hour, as once thought!

      A hot bath or massage is recommened. The same advice given to patients with muscle injuires, so makes sense.
       
    8. gracy

      gracy Member

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      Do upper body when you have pain.
      I mean relax when you have pain.
       
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